• Experiment in Progress: DO NOT DISTURB

    Experiment in Progress: DO NOT DISTURB

    http://clevelandprintroom.com/exhibition/

    EXPERIMENT IN PROGRESS: DO NOT DISTURB

    APRIL 7 THROUGH MAY 10, 2017

    This show features over 15 artists and musicians responding to our recent show that explored the early 20th Century work of a Doctor and Psychoanalyst.

    In the early 20th century, Dr. Smith Ely Jelliffe, a physician, professor, and author, was one of the earliest proponents of psychoanalysis in the United States. Working in New York, Dr. Jelliffe created a series of glass “magic lantern” slides for use in his lectures about mental health, neurology, and psychiatry. Among Smith’s images are photographs of hospitals, patients, x-rays, diagrams, and artwork by patients.

    This in-depth look at early 20th century photographic images that challenge the boundaries between art and documentation have been on view at the Cleveland Print Room from January to March, 2017. The Inside Outside exhibition explored the historic use of photography from an early 20th Century psychiatric practice.

    Late last year, artists and musicians were invited by CPR director Shari Wilkins to create work in response to the Inside Outside exhibition. Wilkins made the collection of 172 slides available to the participants for further study and inspiration. “These hauntingly beautiful slides, along with many reference and technical slides, are the perfect mix, pushing the limits between fine art photography and medical research. The original exhibition, an unusual show to start with, allows us to couple the original lantern slides with the newly created works,” says Wilkins about the upcoming exhibition, with an opening reception, free and open to the public, Friday, April 7. Live music and performances will take place between 7:30 and 8:30 during the opening. The original lantern slides will be available for viewing via an iPad installed in the gallery.

    Featured in the show are works from Laura Ruth Bidwell, John W Carlson, Hadley K Conner, Jeff Curtis, Robert Darkmatter, Yael Eban, Elizabeth Emery, Bianca Fields, Hilary Gent, Stephan Haluska, Jacob Koestler, Greg Martin, Liz Maugans, Deborah Pinter, Melinda Placko, Steven Standley, Arnold Tunstall, Rebekah Wilhelm and Justin Woody.



    GALLERY HOURS


    Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 12-6pm ; Wednesday, 3-6pm ; Saturday, 12-5pm

  • Self Portrait on view at the Morgan Conservatory

    My piece "Self Portrait" is currently on view at the Morgan Conservatory in their annual regional juried show, [re]define, the exhibition runs until Saturday May 16th.

    Juried by William Busta of William Busta Gallery and Liz Maugans of Zygote Press, [re]define is sure to bring forth the most interesting works of art in Cleveland.
    "The wonderful work that Bill and I were so lucky to view and select for the Morgan Conservatory's Regional Juried Exhibition was of such high caliber that we were pleasantly surprised to see such a wide variety of works that merited entry and awards. The inventiveness and innovation in which paper was used (being the main substrate) was important - and was ultimately the great factor in how we selected works. The region is lucky to have such a dynamic resource like the Morgan for papermaking and book arts, and this exhibition celebrates the variety of approaches that artists are using and their product.
    The work we chose for the special prizes made us wonder and contemplate the subtleties and quiet energy in both the concept and craft. The overall take-away experience for us was an immediate sense of pride in the work that is being created in this region."

    - Liz Maugans of Zygote Press

  • Barriers:: Solo Show Salt Gallery New York, New York

    Solo show in New York:
    May 18- 31, 2012

    Salt Space Gallery 1158 Broadway New York, New York 10001
    Cross Street:at 27th St
    Website:saltspacenyc.com
    Transport:Subway: N, R to 28th St

    The barrier is psychological; it operates in either a protective and defensive method, or as a potentially offensive or aggressive act. The barrier sets up an essential divide; through its very existence it separates and distinguishes the relationship between the individual self and the other, consequently causing a denial of access.
    Through the construction and presentation of the information translated through the created work of art I am, as the artist, not only placing myself and my ideals physically through the made object, I am also placing my psychological standpoint or my moral, religious, ideological viewpoints into the work. This presentation of myself to the artistic environment is a very self-conscious and at times uncomfortable act. Therefore using personal text as a method of translating information that is generated entirely from myself, and subsequently thwarting the ability of the viewer to understand the information presented to them allows me to create a psychological defense through the use of the barrier.